Passacaglia (detail)
Manon Caine Russell, Kathryn C. Wanlass, and Marie Eccles Caine Foundation Gift

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22 April
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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

New Exhibition
April 14 - December 10, 2014
Photography Portfolios - Lindy Michel and Holly Reynoso
Thursday, April 17
Exhibit
February 2, 2014 - Summer 2014
Passacaglia (detail)

PASSACAGLIA (DETAIL)

Ann Preston

2007, mixed media; steel, plaster and acrylic paint

Passacaglia was completed by the L.A. artist Ann Preston in 2007. The sculpture's name derives from a musical form related to dance. Like its name, the sculpture is composed of geometric forms- a dance of triangles that combine to become diamonds, transforming yet again into larger geometric units which expand into a counter rythm of contoured panels.

Klompen (detail)

KLOMPEN (DETAIL)

Trimpin

1987, wood, metal, electronics

One of the highlights of the permanent collection is the installation Klompen, by the Seattle-based artist Trimpin. Klompen is a sound sculpture that includes 96 Dutch wooden clogs that connect to a computer by wires suspended from the ceiling. Placing a quarter in the token box electronically triggers mallets in the toes of the shoes. Trimpin is a contemporary artist who uses sound as a medium for sculpture and works between the genres of art, music and science. His influences include German cuckoo clocks, early electronic media and experimental composers. Bring plenty of quarters; Klompen plays 20 different compositions!

Blind Momentum (detail)

BLIND MOMENTUM (DETAIL)

Irving Norman

1960, oil on canvas

In Irving Norman's Blind Momentum, a two panel painting opens up to create a cityscape teeming with the vices of modern technological society. "Irving's work had an underlying theme. Where are we from? Who are we and where are we going? He called this the blind momentum of history. We are being pulled along by our desires, our needs blindly, without a clear idea of where we are going." Hela Norman